All the Feels

18 Nov

We here at CakeIn15 can’t help but feel all the feels when reading this love story. Because it is just that. A story of love. Yes, it’s also a cancer story, and a heartbreaking one at that. The wisdom and grace with which this Minneapolis family has handled this situation makes us proud to be human.

Start reading their story, and help out Ralphie, Nora, and Aaron by donating here. We are thinking about you & sending you positive vibes and love.

You can also order a “Still Kickin” t-shirt here, if you’d rather support that way. xo

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Ralph has always known about Aaron. He was a calm, serene newborn. He never cried, never fussed. He always curled into Aaron at night, even though I was his food source and first home (I am still slightly offended by this, clearly). If Aaron needed me, Ralph would patiently wait his turn. He crawled for the first time in a hospital bed at Abbott. He came to appointments and chemo and waited calmly and patiently, he cuddled with nurses and with lonely old folks who looked like they needed it. He has his father’s heart, and his father’s face (also slightly offended because I did contribute 50% of his genetic material, so…) He has always been tender. He touches Aaron’s scar and kisses his head. The night we told our family about hospice, Ralph set down his blocks, climbed onto the couch and pushed me aside. “I luh you Papa.” He said, and kissed and hugged his father. Today, he keeps coming into the room to say hello, and say good-bye. “All done!” He says “I luh you!” #ralphiegrams

Communist Daughter Return to The Cake Shop – December 7th

18 Nov

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We here at The Cake Shop are excited to announce our next house show! We’re very happy to welcome back Johnny Solomon and Molly Moore of Communist Daughter. Last time their show sold out in under 24 hours, so make sure you get your tickets sooner rather than later.

 

Who is Communist Daughter? The band features founder Johnny Solomon and his wife Molly Moore. In 2007 Solomon moved from Saint Paul, MN to Prescott, WI after the break up of his band Friends Like These. There he began writing and recording under the name Communist Daughter, taking the name from a Neutral Milk Hotel song.

But when he moved out of the Twin Cities his demons followed him. Plagued by his continuing troubles, he spent his nights writing and recording what he thought would be his own eulogy, songs about lost love and lost chances. It wasn’t until he met a young singer named Molly that his collection of songs became the beginning of something new. Promising to sing with him if he got clean Johnny began the long road back to music.

Calling his new band Communist Daughter, he moved back across the border and released the debut album Soundtrack to the End in 2010, then checked himself in to treatment. Clean and sober, and (in 2013) married to the singer Molly Moore, and with their band, (Adam Switlick on bass, Dan Demuth on drums, Al Weiers on guitar and Dillon Marchus on keys and guitars) they released the EP Lions & Lambs and toured extensively. Check out a video of the band here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EYmDoM9jGfM or via their website: http://www.communistdaughter.com/

Reservations are $15 and are limited, so reserve your spot via Brown Paper Tickets today. Watch for your BPT confirmation as that will contain exact address of the Cake Shop. All funds from the door go directly to support the artist.

What: CakeIn15 presents Communist Daughter
Where: The Cake Shop, South Minneapolis, address upon reservation
When: 2 shows!
Sunday, December 7th – Doors 3:30pm, Music at 4:00pm
Sunday, December 7th – Doors 6:00pm, Music at 6:30pm
How Much: $15 reservation ($16.52 with fee), all funds after fees to the artist

Reserve Your Spot:
http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/943496

We’re looking forward to seeing you back at the Cake Shop!

Love,

Stacy & Carl

The Cake Shop is dedicated to providing artists and audiences with a unique and intimate experience that allows artists to freely experiment with new material. Shows at The Cake Shop directly financially support the musicians playing. Previous performances include Caroline Smith & Jesse Schuster, The Starfolk, Fair Oaks, Rachel Ries, Spirits of the Red City, Zoo Animal, Dark Dark Dark and Elephant Micah, Pezzettino, Roma Di Luna, Jeremy Messersmith, The Pines, Ben Kyle & Carrie Rodriguez, We Are The Willows (Peter Miller), batteryboy, and Chastity Brown.

Fair Oaks and The Starfolk at the Cake Shop

8 Nov

Cake Shop November 16

We’re excited to announce that bands are coming back to The Cake Shop! Sunday, November 16th at 6pm will see not one, but two great bands will play an intimate house show. We’re welcoming Fair Oaks and The Starfolk – it’s a $10 bill, so come out and support these bands. Get your tickets here!

Details
Who: Fair Oaks and The Starfolk
When: Sunday, November 16th, doors at 5:30pm, show at 6pm
Where: The Cake Shop (private house show)
How Much: $10/person
Tickets: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/943489

About Fair Oaks:

Formed in two cities founded on the intrinsic turns and tails of one of Earth’s longest waterways, Fair Oaks from Minneapolis-Saint Paul, Minnesota, has made an album that aims to shine a solar-hued spotlight on nature in the urban environment.

The group’s debut full length This Is The River is bookended with a basket’s worth of texturally and lyrically dense fuzzy pop songs that guard the album’s centerpiece three-part titular track. Like spilt oil paints, “THIS IS THE RIVER” is a sprawling and polychromatic piece that at times gallops and at others whirs south along the banks of the Mighty Mississippi.

Made up of singer-songwriter Andy Ulseth, multi-instrumentalists Eric Carlson and Molly Manning, as well as bassist Mitch Schumer and percussionist Matthew Lenard, Fair Oaks has crafted an enthralling and elegant debut release that will reward multiple listens.

About The Starfolk:

The Starfolk makes melody-rich chamber pop music that rocks in front man Brian Tighe’s quintessentially ethereal way. Tighe fronted power-pop darlings The Hang Ups in the 90’s, co-fronts bittersweet girl-boy poppers The Owls, and plays lead guitar with the belovedly hush-toned Jeremy Messersmith.

“Tighe still boasts that distinctively airy tenor and a penchant for setting beautiful vocal melodies atop unusual chord progressions recently described with rightful awe by Messersmith as “like doing ballet in a minefield.” In fact, The Starfolk achieve a far broader sound than that of their frontman’s power-pop past.” -Rob Van Alstyne, City Pages.

In The Starfolk, Tighe is joined by Allison LaBonne (The Owls, Typsy Panthre) on bass, Jacqueline Ultan (Jelloslave, Saltee) on cello, and Stephen Ittner (The Hang Ups, The Owls) on drums. Their debut full length is out now on Korda Records.

About The Cake Shop:

The Cake Shop is dedicated to providing artists and audiences with a unique and intimate experience that allows artists to freely experiment with new material. Shows at The Cake Shop directly financially support the musicians playing. Previous performances include Caroline Smith & Jesse Schuster, Rachel Ries, Spirits of the Red City, Zoo Animal, Dark Dark Dark and Elephant Micah, Pezzettino, Roma Di Luna, Jeremy Messersmith, The Pines, Ben Kyle & Carrie Rodriguez, We Are The Willows, batteryboy, Communist Daughter, and Chastity Brown.

EX by Skewed Visions

26 Oct

If you’ve been through the collection of the Walker Art Center looking for the brightest and flashiest pieces, you would have walked right past Robert Gober’s sculpture, Untitled Door and Door Frame. An ordinary, white painted door frame opens up into a small, fluorescent-lit room, where the companion piece, the door itself, leans up against the back wall. You would walk past and miss it, but it’s worth stepping in to. The combination of the light, the white door on the white wall, the milky translucence of the paint, all lend themselves to a ghostly, slightly ethereal feeling, but the smallness of the room, the buzz of the closeness of your body with others make it a visceral moment.

Ex-couch

This is a similar experience to EX, the new work by Charles Campbell produced by Skewed Visions at the California Building. EX is a quiet and meditative work, but one filled with palpable physicality, humanity and significance. The audience is seated in the center of the raw studio space, while the performers – Annie Enneking, Megan Mayer, Billy Mullaney and Campbell – move around the room. The props are simple, mundane – door, similar to Gober’s door, an office chair, a coffee table, a couch, picture frames, a strongbox – but become representative presences throughout the show. The sensation of breathing next to people, with the lights up, the performers’ breathes and footfalls, all of these things come together to heighten reality and our own awareness of our living body.

The impetus for EX came from grief. In the course of a year, Campbell lost his mother to Alzheimer’s and his sister to cancer. But with it’s dance sequences, non-linear or narrative structure and visual gags, EX isn’t maudlin or saccharine. Campbell and his collaborators have a history and trust together that lets them take a light touch with heaviness. There is something important, and lovely, that in a work about personal loss, the performers who helped create the show are trusted, long-standing collaborators, a nod to the families that we make for ourselves to see us through life.

The levity of certain moments, the variations on repeated patterns, silence, they all combine to occasional devastating effect. Mayer* carrying Mullaney, thin, with a shaved head in an oversized white T-shirt may be the most tragic thing you see on stage this year. The refrain of “Get. The fuck. Away!” is resonant as a reaction for self preservation, even from ourselves. The dance sequences of punctuated physicality leave questions about what is and out of frame, how tangled up are we in our everyday things, how do we share with others?

On the site for EX, Campbell has written a few notes about the work:

It’s not an epic story of human struggle.
It’s not a political parable for our times.
It’s not about you and your family.
It doesn’t speak from the heart.
It won’t make you feel better about yourself.
It won’t stay long.

The only one I know for sure is true is that it won’t stay long – EX closes November 1. So make some space for yourself to see the show. Take deep breaths, get into the room and hold it for an hour.

*A previous version of this post identified Campbell as the one carrying Mullaney. I spent a lot of time in show thinking about how each performer was channeling both Campbell and his family at various points, so, mission accomplished, I guess.

Next at the Cake Shop: Kickin’ Ass and Takin’ Names

15 Sep

We’re taking a little hiatus from our hiatus to bring you something completely different. On Sunday, September 21st, the Cake Shop presents Kickin’ Ass and Takin’ Names, a wild one-man show from Seth Lepore. It’s pretty impossible to tell what might happen in this partially rehearsed, part improvised, hilariously stream-of-consciousness show, so Aisle Say Twin Cities will have to say it for us: “Sometimes the scene itself is funny; sometimes it is the randomness and sheer absurdity. And very frequently, it’s just because Lepore has a great stage presence, and has such an intensely physical style that it’s impossible to stop staring at him.”

There you have it. Come stare at Seth Lepore in our living room. Get your tickets here.

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Paul McCartney at Target Field

3 Aug

You guys, Paul McCartney is kind of magical.

I mean, he’s a Beatle, and the Beatles are, in the words of Chuck Klosterman, a “perfectly rated” band. We all generally agree that they made some of the greatest popular music ever, and that consensus is true. He could, at age 72, approach touring with a laissez-faire kind of attitude, and we’d probably say, “Wow, it was great just to be able to see him before he kicked off.” He could, we would, but he doesn’t, so we don’t have to.

Instead we get almost 3 hours of nonstop action, from the Beatles songs that are scratched into our souls to Wings hits to new stuff that pops. We get eye-jiggling, gleefully-giggling, hip-wiggling wonder and joy. We get energy, anecdotes and fireworks. McCartney doesn’t put on an impressive show for a 72 year-old, he puts on an impressive show, full stop. I’d say young bands should learn from him, but they also don’t have a 50 year catalog of hits to pull from, so that’s probably not fair. McCartney is out of this world great.

Saturday night at Target Field, it was all on display, from the classics of “All My Lovin’,” “Day Tripper” and “Yesterday,” to the heart-breakingly beautiful takes of “Maybe I’m Amazed,” “Blackbird,” “Eleanor Rigby” and “Let It Be” to the full-throttle, pyromaniac heaviness of “Live and Let Die,” “Back in the USSR” and “Helter Skelter” to the crowd singalongs of “Band on the Run,” “Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da” and “Hey Jude.” The new tracks, off the aptly titled New, like “Save Us,” Queenie” and “New” held up as well, bouncing along with Macca’s verve and glee.

At some point into the second encore (there would be threeAfter seeing the setlist, there were only 2 encores. “Only.”) I thought to myself, “This has to end sometime, but I really hope it doesn’t.” I would have been happy for Paul to just sit down and start jamming out on new tracks if he’d wanted. But the night did have to end, and when it did, the phenomenal band closed out with “Golden Slumbers,” a song with perhaps the perfect coda to a concert so full of generous spirit and creative energy – “The love you take is equal to the love you make.” We got so much, and gave it right back. Let’s do it again soon.

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Paul McCartney – Paperback Writer [Partial] from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

Paul McCartney – Blackbird from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

Paul McCartney – Something from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

Macca – fireworks! Fire! Paul! from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

Paul McCartney – Yesterday from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

photo(7)

Rock the Garden 2014

24 Jun

Review by Pat O’Brien

Saturday’s photography by Jenna Klein & Sunday’s photography by Mark Kartarik

This past weekend Rock the Garden once more took place, but for the first time it spread the wealth over two days—with scant, if any, growing pains to be had in the process. Saturday went off without a hitch weather-wise, and while rain threatened for a bit on Sunday (and even gently showered during Valerie June’s southern-fried, neat-as-a-pin set, the rock gods must have brokered a truce with the weather gods, leaving the crowd dry for the remainder of the day.

SATURDAY

David Campbell & Barb Abney

David Campbell & Barb Abney

 

What worked: Starting off with Lizzo’s 45-minute, atom bomb of a set was precisely the proper intro to the weekend. Nobody’s hotter locally right now and it’s no accident. The former Melissa Jefferson is on her way up at break-neck speed and her set mirrored that. Frenetic but on point for the entire time, Lizzo seems about six months from superstardom.

Lizzo

Lizzo

 

Lizzo & members of GRRRL Party

Lizzo & members of GRRRL Party

 

What worked: Hometown boy made good: Local vintage-dusted pop-rocker Jeremy Messersmith had the distinction of having the weekend’s biggest entourage on stage with him and didn’t disappoint with a tight, rollicking set that had him revisiting many high points of his career thus far (and there are plenty to choose from), as well as showcasing some newer material. He’s always a treat, but Messersmith really put together a tight set for what was his biggest crowd to date.

Jeremy Messersmith

Jeremy Messersmith

 

Jeremy Messersmith

Jeremy Messersmith

 

What didn’t work: Best Coast’s set, while appropriate for Saturday’s late-afternoon sun, seemed to drag on forever. They have an amusing shtick, but it’s best taken in bite-sized pieces—an hour-long set of three-chord, mid-tempo stoner pop gets old fast. Cosetino’s voice eventually becomes about as interesting as an oscillating fan and twice I found myself asking, “Didn’t they play this song already?”

Best Coast

Best Coast

 

Best Coast

Best Coast

 

What worked:  Matt & Kim’s explosive, maniacally fun set on Saturday was the weekend’s highlight. From Kim Schifino’s penchant for between-song f-bombs and crawling on top of her drum kit, to Matt Johnson’s endless cheerleading of the crowd to have more fun, their set transcended their often too-goofy-by-half songs and made it seem as though they brought Saturday’s sun-drenched afternoon with them solely for our enjoyment.

Matt & Kim

Matt & Kim

 

RTG_2014_23

 

Matt & Kim

Matt & Kim

 

Crowd at Matt & Kim

 

Crowd during De La Soul

 

What didn’t work: De La Soul, who I had been looking forward to seeing for weeks, dropped the ball as headliners on Saturday. The set was unfocused, muddy and they neglected to play their new single, which is the best thing they’ve had in a long time. They also managed to turn in an outright terrible version of “Me, Myself and I,” which was easily the biggest disappointment of the weekend. They seem to be on a creative resurgence lately, and I’m hopeful that there are just some growing pains involved in the process.

De La Soul

De La Soul

 

De La Soul

De La Soul

 

RTG_2014_42

 

De La Soul

De La Soul

 SUNDAY

What worked – Ladies first: Both days saw a solo female open the show (Lizzo on Saturday, Valerie June on Sunday) but there were many more onstage during the course of the weekend, from Dessa who offered a heavy, thought-provoking set on Sunday and Best Coast’s Bethany Cosentino, who put on a fairly one-note set Saturday (cats, weed and California only lend themselves to so much diversified material) and Matt and Kim’s Kim Schifino, women were all over this year’s lineup.

Valerie June

Valerie June

 

Valerie June

Valerie June

 

What worked – Stunt casting: Kurt Vile turned in the weekend’s most intriguing set. His jammy, ethereal guitar rock seemingly tailor-made for a festival atmosphere like Rock the Garden. Spreading  just seven songs out over his set, and seemingly winning some new fans in the process–the crowd was abuzz about him by the time he walked off stage.

Kurt Vile

Kurt Vile

 

Kurt Vile

Kurt Vile

 

Middle Ground: Dessa put on a thought-provoking, heavy-handed set on Sunday and while it’s always a treat to see her, she felt just a bit out of place offering up domestic abuse ruminations just a few minutes before Guided By Voices. Maybe it was her placement in the lineup, or simply the nature of festivals where there always seems to be an odd man (or woman) out. She threw a jar of show-sponsor Talenti gelato in the crowd about halfway through and and at one point crowd-surfed, and even ended her set in the crowd, but, while Dessa is incredibly talented and has a lot to say, it’s hard to describe her as “fun.” This isn’t a knock, it’s grounded in the nature of the subjects (domestic abuse, etc.) she chooses to address.

Dessa

Dessa

 

Dessa

Dessa

 

Dessa

Dessa

 

Aby Wolf

Aby Wolf

 

Dessa & Aby Wolf

Dessa & Aby Wolf

 

Dessa

Dessa

 

Robert Pollard

Robert Pollard

 

What worked – Stunt casting: Legendary stalwarts Guided By Voices put on a pretty great set on Sunday, running through nearly two dozen songs both old and new. Lead singer Robert Pollard was slinging smart remarks (“We’ve played here at least twenty times and Paul Westerberg never shows up.”) while swigging from a handle of tequila and the occasional beer. It wasn’t their steadiest set and was easily the weekend’s most confusing for a good portion of the skewed-younger crowd. The short songs with odd names like “Cut-Out Witch” and “Tractor Rape Chain” are a love-it-or-leave-it affair, but they had the distinction of being the best example of what the Current is all about: new music that’s influenced by older, sometimes underappreciated music. GBV have the distinction of fitting on both ends of that spectrum.

Guided By Voices

Guided By Voices

 

Guided By Voices

Guided By Voices

 

Guided By Voices

Guided By Voices

 

Robert Pollard

Robert Pollard

 

Robert Pollard

Robert Pollard

 

What worked: Spoon closing Sunday’s show was also a masterstroke. Britt Daniel and company took a break for a few years but they’re back and the break seems to have rejuvenated them creatively – they show no signs of slowing down. From the opening notes of the new songs to old favorites like “I Turn My Camera On” and “Don’t Make Me a Target,”  nobody put on a more fully rounded and solid performance over the weekend.

Britt Daniel

Britt Daniel

 

Spoon

Spoon

 

Rock the Garden 2014

 

Overall, it was a pretty great lineup and, of course not everything can be a homerun. There were far more ups than there were downs and with roughly ten hours of music happening over the course of the weekend. It shook out to be a wise idea to host Rock the Garden over the course of two days. It had to have been a hell of a thing to plan, but the two-day format should be standard from now on.

 

Rock the Garden 2014

 

The Eels with Steve Perry of Journey at the Fitzgerald Theater – May 25, 2014

26 May

The Eels at the Fitzgerald Theater

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

In retrospect, we all should have seen it coming. When Mark Oliver Everett opened up the Eels show with a gruff, sweet take on Disney‘s “When You Wish Upon a Star” he was obviously tapping into a deep wish for the return of a lost American star. When he first spoke to the crowd and announced that we were going on a journey – “But it’s a bummer journey” – before assuring us that it would end up alright, he was laying down some heavy hints for us to pick up. But it wasn’t until Steve Perry – Steve “The Voice” Perry from Journey, who hasn’t really sung in 20 some years – was midway through putting his silky spin on “It’s a Motherfucker” as our brains collectively short-circuited that we could even start to realize what was happening, what had happened. I’m still not sure that it happened, but I know that it did because “Open Arms” and “Lovin’ Touchin’ Squeezin’” killed, and there’s video proof:

“It’s a Motherfucker” – The Eels with Steve Perry. Steve Motherfucking Perry. from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

This would have been a lovely Eels show regardless. Backed by percussion that included a full drum kit, timpani and bells, upright bass, trumpet and pedal steel, this show had – for all of E’s protestations about being lovelorn and lost – a warm and human touch to it. After playing an eclectic set that included amped up versions of some of his biggest hits E ran out into the crowd and did a lap through the Fitz, giving and taking hugs, before dedicating “I Like the Way This is Going” to “the 19 girls I hugged.”

_SAS3002

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

Tunes like “A Line In The Dirt” did carry the wry sorrow and pain of broken relationships with them, but they were balanced out by the determined, more forward-looking, “Mistakes of Youth” and other tunes, and the cover of “Fools Rush In” was sweet and resigned, from a man experienced enough to know what comes next.

“Fresh Feelin'” – The Eels at the Fitzgerald Theater from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

Except, with an Eels show, you can never really know what comes next. And sometimes, you get Steve Perry, and you all get to sing “Na na na na na na” into the night.

©Stacy Schwartz - All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

Setlist
When You Wish Upon a Star
Things The Grandchildren Should Know
Parallels
Mansions of Los Feliz
My Timing is Off
A Line In The Dirt
Where I’m From
Lockdown Hurricane
A Daisy Through Concrete
Grace Kelly Blues
Fresh Feeling
I Like Birds
My Beloved Monster
Gentleman’s Choice
Mistakes of My Youth
Where I’m Going

Encore
I Like the Way This is Going
Blinking Lights
Last Stop: This Town

Encore #2
Fools Rush In (Where Angels Fear to Tread) (Rube Bloom/Johnny Mercer)
Turn on Your Radio (Harry Nilsson)

Encore #3 WITH STEVE PERRY
It’s a Motherfucker
Open Arms (Journey)
Lovin’ Touchin’ Squeezin’ (Journey)

More video to come!

©Stacy Schwartz - All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz - All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz - All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz - All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz - All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz - All Rights Reserved

©Stacy Schwartz – All Rights Reserved

James Andrews at the Cowles Center

20 May

James Andrews “What a Wonderful World” #artspematters from CakeIn15 on Vimeo.

Last night at the Cowles Center in downtown Minneapolis, Artspace threw a party celebrating its work this year. If you don’t know, Artspace is an organization based in Minneapolis dedicated to creating affordable artist housing and live/work spaces, currently operating 35 spaces in 13 states, with 4 more projects in the works. For the celebration Buckets and Tap Shoes and singer Ashley Dubose (an Artspace resident) were on hand, and since one of the next projects is down in New Orleans, so was jazz trumpeter James Andrews. Here’s his take on the Louis Armstrong classic, bringing the Mississippi back around full circle.

2014 Stone Arch Bridge Festival Announces Music Lineup

20 May

StoneArchPoster2014
The Stone Arch Bridge Festival has finally announced their lineup for 2014! Our very own Staciaann continues her streak, booking the festival for the 8th year in a row.

This year features a wide variety of hip-hop, good ol’ fashioned rock n’ roll, folk, jazz, and country, as well as a few things that just don’t fit into any genre. Every year brings an overabundance of talent – which is both awesome and frustrating as there are limited spots for music during this three-day festival. The big shows take place after 7pm on Water Power Park (a really cool place, if you haven’t been) and feature the likes of Mike Munson, Frankie Lee, & The Cactus Blossoms on Friday night, followed up by Greg Grease & Sean Anonymous on Saturday… which leads right into the festivities across the river for Northern Spark. Super excited for that!

Enough waiting… here’s the full lineup!

Friday, June 13, 2014

Cities 97 Stage on Water Power Park

7:00 p.m. Mike Munson
7:30 p.m.Frankie Lee
8:30 p.m. Mike Munson
9:00 p.m.The Cactus Blossoms

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Star Tribune Stage in Father Hennepin Park

1:15 p.m. Sarah Morris
2:15 p.m. Swallows
3:15 p.m. Andra Suchy
4:15 p.m. Mother Banjo
5:15 p.m. Jessica Manning
6:15 p.m. Tortuga!

Cities 97 Stage on Water Power Park

12:00 p.m. Jill.
12:45 p.m. Danami and the Blue
1:45 p.m. Verskotzi
2:45 p.m. Vision the Kid & Tru
3:45 p.m. Step Rockets
4:45 p.m. Two Harbors
5:45 p.m. Taj Raj
6:45 p.m. Unknown Prophets
7:45 p.m. Greg Grease
9:00 p.m. Sean Anonymous

City Pages Stage Under the Central Avenue Bridge

11.15 a.m. Bob & Lynn Dixon
12:15 p.m. David Gerald Sutton
1:15 p.m. Walker Fields
2:15 p.m. Stephanie Says
3:15 p.m. Will Bauermeister
4:15 p.m. Mike Munson
5:15 p.m. Adam Svec
6:15 p.m. Kind Red Spirits

Sunday, June 15, 2014

Star Tribune Stage in Father Hennepin Park

12:15 p.m. Jillian Rae
1:15 p.m. Peter Lochner
2:15 p.m. Steve Noonan
3:15 p.m. Maple & Beech
4:15 p.m. Jake Ilika & the Heavy Set

Cities 97 Stage on Water Power Park

12:oo p.m. Street Hassle
1:00 p.m. Some Pulp
2:05 p.m. Johnny Rey
3:10 p.m. Courtney Yasmineh Band
4:15 p.m. Ruben

City Pages Stage Under the Central Avenue Bridge

12:15 p.m. EMOT
1:15 p.m. Billy Johnson
2:15 p.m. Dan Israel
3:15 p.m. Ben Glaros
4:15 p.m. Paul Seeba

VTK&TRU

Vision the Kid & Tru

UnknownProphets

Unknown Prophets

Taj Raj

Taj Raj

 

Jessica Manning

Jessica Manning